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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
an uneventful night. >> mohamed morsi under siege after 100,000 protests in the streets. >>> l.a.'s mayor has announced an end to an eight-day strike at the largest port complex. >>> best man's friend is learning a new trick. how to drive a car. get off the road. >> three, two, one. >> god bless us, every one. >>> nine weeks, officially over. >> snooki wants to give baby advice to kate middleton. her number one advice, find out advice to kate middleton. her number one advice, find out who the father is. captioning funded by cbs e to cbs >>> welcome to "cbs this morning." headline out of washington, a lot of talk. not a lot of action. not surprisingly, the white house and congress remain far from any deal to prevent automatic tax hikes and spending cuts. >> with just 27 days to go, republicans are not talking with the obama administration and the president is only talking on tv. major garrett is at the white house. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, charlie and norah. yesterday at the white house there were vague references to conversations about the the fiscal cliff with congress iion r
. thanks. >>> in egypt, opponents of president mohammed morsi are expected to take to the streets again. they were out in force last night in cairo chanting it was time for their president to resign. their anger was sparked two weeks ago when morsi granted himself sweeping powers. last night, morsi refused to rescind that decree, despite calls from proponents calling for him to do so. >>> the photographer who took a picture of a man standing on the subway tracks as a train approached insists he was trying to alert the driver of the train. that photo make it on the front page of the "new york post" it is sparking outrage. people are asking why the photographer did not do more to help the victim? he told anderson cooper he was too far away on the platform to do anything else. >> the only way i thought at that moment was to start clicking away, using the shutter to fire the flash and maybe -- >> you thought that might warn the conductor? >> the victim was pushed on to the tracks. he said the only thing he would have urged him to do differently is to out-run the train. >>> seven new counts
, this is in cairo. it was there last night that supporters and owe points of president mohamed morsi clashed. they hurled rocks and molotov cocktails at each other. at least five people were killed, hundreds injured. the root of the violence is what many believe is morsi's grab for power. ian lee joins us this morning. what's happening right now. >> reporter: we have the elite republican guard, the people tasked with protecting the president. they are putting up barbed wire and road blocks, diverting traffic and people away and trying to keep the two sides, the pro-morsi and the anti-morsi protesters away from each other. last flight we saw thousands of pro-morsi supporters camp outside of the presidential palace, that is after they went there and removed, by force, the anti-morsi protesters. but now we have a small -- protests are planned for today against morsi and their plan to defe descend, again, on the presidential palace. >> a direct constitution has been approved and egyptians are scheduled to vote on it next week. is there something in this proposal that has protesters so angry? >>
become the best friend of the muslim brotherhood in egypt, even as president mohamed morsi was asserting dictatorial powers and his followers were beating up secular liberals in the streets of cairo? when assessing the turbulent events in the arab world, we should remind ourselves that we're witnessing a revolution that may take decades to produce a stable outcome, with the outcome so hard to predict, it's a mistake to make big bets on any particular player. america will help the arab world through this turmoil if it states clearly that u.s. policy is guided by its interests and values, not by transient alliances and friendships. if morsi wants to be treated as a democratic leader, he will have to act like one." and david, i guess we can begin with that question. will he ultimately? can he? and are these fluctuations expected? >> morsi did something that's, in hindsight, a very stupid move. on november 22nd, he announced that he was no longer subject to review by the egyptian courts. and this was read, i think, properly as an attempt to get near dictatorial powers as egypt headed toward
to say this was a spontaneous attack, try to link it to that mohammed movie that president obama tried to link it to for the next two weeks. >> do you think she lied? >> i don't know that. for me she's unqualified to be secretary of state because she doesn't seem to have the independent judgment to make analysis like these talking points don't make sense. >> president obama said after the resignation came in, i deeply regret the unfair and misleading attacks on susan rice in recent weeks. the other thing i've been hearing today from many people in washington is, look, yes, the benghazi thing was probably part of this, but actually what worsened her case really was when she went to try and have it out with senators mccain and the others and really came off second best again. she got led down a garden path and came out with thorns everywhere. and people were saying, you know, she's just a bit inexperienced to deal with bruises like this. what does that mean for her on the world stage. is that a fair criticism? >> also fair. was she in above her head? quite possible. maybe she was in abov
about several things. first of all, all concerning president mohammed morsi and this growing perception that he is making himself too powerful. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. >> opposition factions back protesting against mohammed morrissey for nearly two weeks. most of the protests have been limited to tahrir square, but they're now going to the source of their anger, president morrissey, and his presidential palace. >> why come here? >> because it's -- we got fed up. >> he doesn't respect us. he don't want to listen to our demands. >> reporter: what's your message to him by coming out here? >> that what he is doing is completely unfair. this is not what we asked for. it's complete dictatorship. >> reporter: at one point there were tense moments when protests clashed with police and broke through a police barrier, but things called down pretty quickly. the president in no danger. he left at some point. the protests continue empassioned but peaceful. there you hear the chants of dictator, dictator. like much of egypt, most of these people are muslims, but you'll also find the moderates,
's referendum vote on a divisive new constitution. it was drafted largely by allies of mohamed morsi. an egyptian spoke men said that they will aim at ending the political crisis. >>> and a global call for countries to lift their hiv travel restrictions. 45 nations seen on this map have laws that deport, detain, or deny entry to people who are hiv positive. now companies like coca-cola and gap and from the nba say those travel bans are discriminatory and bad for business. until recently, the u.s., too, had regular layings that barred foreign nationals from receiving a visa from entering the country. president obama lifted that ban in 2010. >>> and a chain of check stores is selling what they believe is the, yes, very last shipment of twinkies in the country. jewel said that hostess offered the entire shipment left in the georgia plant, including 20,000 boxes of twinkies and 5,000 boxes of ding dongs, zingers and you can buy them while supplies last but not for much longer. if you're thinking of the gift to give someone, just don't know what to get them, give them a twinkie. >> when w
's a very short list. one name on it. >> short list of one. >>> live pictures of a pro president mohamed morsi rally in cairo. she a members of the opposition say the constitution is too islamist and infringes on minority rights. protesting outside the presidential palace right now. >>> new this morning, a 6.4 magnitude earthquake off the coast of baja. so far, no tsunami warnings. >>> clackamas town center will reopen to shoppers in six hours. that's the mall where a gunman killed two people on tuesday and critically wounded a third before killing himself. a candle-light vigil will be held outside the mall. >>> a funeral for fallen dallas cowboys player jerry brown. brown was killed in a suspected drunk driving accident on saturday. his teammate and friend josh brent was behind the wheel. you are looking at new dashcam video of the wreck released by police along with 911 calls they received in moments after the accident. >> is anybody injured? >> i don't know. i just drove past it. looks like it just happened. a car upside down. >> josh brent is free on half a million dollars bail. he's
those for and against president mohamed morsi after he gave himself unchecked powers last month. the opposition is calling for new nationwide protests ahead of the vote. >>> and the nobel peace prize has been given to the european union. the three presidents of the eu's main bodies accepted the prestigious award this morning at a ceremony in oslo, norway, but this year's choice was not without controversy. three former nobel laureates wrote a letter of protest saying the union doesn't qualify as a peace maker. >>> for the second time in two weekds, an nfl team overcomes the death of a teammate with a victory on the field. this time it was the dallas cowboys. on the sidelines sunday, the jersey of jerry brown jr. was draped over the team bench. a member of the practice squad, brown died saturday in a car crash driven by a teammate, the car was. the cowboys came back from a nine-point deficit to beat the cincinnati bengals on a dramatic last second field goal. brown's jersey was held up after the emotional win, and following the game, cowboys head coach jason garrett talked about
to overthrow a dictator of 30 years, even if he was an american ally. and now you have mohamed morsi behaving like a, well, a dictator. and he's now got roughly 39, 40 political parties in egypt rising up against him. it is a mess. >> what you're seeing in places like egypt is the difference between democracy and majoritarianism. winning elections is the easy part. the question is whether they can govern, whether there's any tolerance for minorities, for multiple points of view. he did a power grab. there's now pushback. i think it's wrong to assume, though, that all the people pushing back are necessarily democrats. >> no. >> a lot of people are just going to try to take advantage. >> but everybody's pushing back, and certainly elements of mubarak's regime are looking for an opportunity to regain some power. but you also have coptic christian pushing back, other islamists pushing back, some even more extreme. >> exactly. >> you have all elements pushing back here. i'm absolutely bewildered as to why morsi thought he could get away with this. >> these are guys, morsi, who are either in jail o
, the response is nothing. mohammed's son tells us, "today, i sent my brother to get bread at 6:00 a.m." look, it's 3:00 p.m. right now and he hasn't gotten any. the kids haven't eaten." the power is out, as it has been for weeks. and now the water is cut as well. there is a growing sense of desperation among people here. stalked by both hunger and danger. "god gave me these children. these children are my responsibility," the man laments. now i can't even get them a loaf of bread. before, i could. now, i can't. the price of bread has skyrocketed due to a flour shortage. along with it, a population's anger. the situation is so dire that people say society is beginning to disintegrate. this is yet another bread line. we were just at one further up the road where the crowd ended up mobbing around us, furious. they said that they wanted us to leave because they were fed up with people filming them. they feel as if the world is simply mocking their misery. and just four days, the cost of fuel jumped from 85 syrian pounds to 150. but beyond the now astronomical cost of survival, it's the constant fear
. >> elsewhere in the region, egypt right now, we're seeing these protesters, these anti-mohammed morsi protesters moving closer and closer towards the presidential pass palace in cairo. they're concerned about what morsi is doing as far as democracy in egypt. how worried are you about the situation in egypt? >> i think egypt is key to the region, so the answer is, you've got to be extremely worried when you see instability affecting egypt. this is, again, the birth pangs of proper democracy in some ways, but this struggle is immensely important. obviously what's important in these countries where they've moved to a democratic system is that there is a clear understanding that democracy is not just a way of voting but a way of thinking. pant of that way of thinking is that you've got to protect minorities. you've got to -- democracy doesn't function unless it is accompanied by an open mind. and so you can understand there is a lot of anxiety in egypt about the constitutional changes proposed. and even as the international community obviously applauded egypt's efforts in bringing about t
the will -- >> these conditions that mohammed has put forward are unacceptable? >> everything could be discussed on the table, but not conditions. >> he says -- what about, are you open at least to postponing the referendum on the c constituti constitution? moving from december 15th? >> if we are returning back to the will of the people. why should we be -- we can change the constitution, if there is the will of the people to change it. and today it was announced that if there is a need for amendments we can elect a new parliament, and within the new parliament, they have the right to make changes to the prosecution. we insist on returning to the people. the regional source of power. >> the argument -- the accusation that's been made is that president morsi, he was democratically elected. he got just more than 51% of the vote, which is enough to get him elected president of egypt the first election in egypt ever shall we say. he's beginning to act like a dictator. >> well, i think this is unacceptable conditions. he is insisting on carrying on with the democratic process. he's devolving his powers, returning
opponents of mohamed morsi are gathering. the crowds are set to be calm. activists are determined to keep up the pressure and refused to descend the decree granting himself powers. his government has lost legitimacy. >>> union supporters in michi n michigan -- they are headed to the governors desk. final approval could come next week. it would make michigan the 24th right to work state in the nation. >>> chris christie explains his change of heart of president obama. check out what he told jon stewart on "the daily show." >> people have different skill sets at different times. >> so he wasn't a leader until you needed leadership? >> maybe until he was presented with a stark opportunity. >> "thursday night football" the denver broncos beat the oakland raiders 26-13. that's eight straight wins for the broncos. one sad note. a fan fell from the top deck of the coliseum during that game. he is hospitalized and he is in serious condition. it's a dreadful thing. >> certainly hope he can recover. that's terrible. >>> let's turn and talk about a story we chatted about yesterday. the cover story for
of the egypt presidential palace and sprayed graffiti. demonstrators threw rocks at the home of mohamed morsi, furious over his decree expanding his powers, putting it beyond judicial review. the opposition is demanding he postpone a december 15 referendum on a draft constitution. critics fear the charter would help the islamist dominated government consolidate its power. >>> an a powerful earthquake struck on japan's northeast coast today. 7.3 magnitude quake shook buildings in tokyo. looking at video there. it triggered a three foot tsunami wave. japan is still recovering from a massive earthquake you remember and tsunami that killed more than 15,000 people last year. >>> wow. the owner of this jewelry store in georgia says it's a miracle no one was killed when this happened. a driver accidentally rammed her minivan into the store. she told police a cannister lodged against the gas pedal. flying glass hit customers, one woman had a deep cut in the back of her head. the store had $30,000 in damage, but thank goodness no one was seriously, seriously injured or killed. look at that, wolf. wow.
out in tahrir square. also amassing supporters of president mohamed morsi and a controversial vote this weekend on a new constitution. today as you might imagine, tensions are very high as the political crisis threatens to ignite new conflicts. reza, what is happening now? >> reporter: ted, i don't think too many people want a repeat performance what have we saw last week, at the presidential palace where the two sides of the conflict met here and came to blows, nearly 700 people injured in clashes, several people killed. today the stage is set for another potentially violent and explosive day, because both these sides again have called for mass demonstrations within the next hour, opposition factions, critics of the president, have set out on marches that are going to culminate here at the presidential palace. in about 15, 20 minutes away from this location, that's where the muslim brotherhood, the supporters of the president, have called for their own demonstrations. i think a lot of people are relieved that these demonstrations aren't going to be at the same location but the pot
is here. she's picking up that part of the story. >> embattled president mohammed morsi went on nationwide tv. he addressed the protests. he seemed to inflamed their outrage. within minutes, the muslim brotherhood headquarters in cairo was up in flames. reza joins us on the phone from cairo. we want to talk about president morsi in a second. first, you just arrived at the scene of the fire at the muslim brotherhood headquarters. what are you seeing, and what are you learning about who's responsible for this? >> reporter: let's verify what happened. two hours ago, they reported the main headquarters here in cairo was attacked by protesters and torched. we raced over here. we're in front of the headquarters right now. there's no indication of a fire here, but certainly there's a large group of what appear to be opponents of president morsi and the muslim brotherhood. they're trying to do everything they can to get to this building, and they're being blocked by police. so we have yet another standoff. if anyone thought president morsi's speech would pacify these people and calm them down, thi
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)

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